[Music Event] East Meets West Concert 3: Space – 2nd August

National Gugak Center_August

In the third of the KCCUK’s East meets West Concert,  our attention is turned to the Space in which the music was written and played. This is a rare opportunity to hear Yeongsanhoesang as well as late works for cello and piano by Franz Liszt. Originally Yeongsanhoesang was Buddhist vocal music and transmitted with court dance. However, Buddhist influences of the music disappeared during the Confucian Joseon dynasty, and it became the most representative of Confucian scholars’ music. Cellist Sung-Won Yang and pianist Enrico Pace then take us to the European intellectual’s world of the 19th century. Liszt was not only a composer and virtuoso pianist – he was also a conductor, teacher, arranger, organist, philanthropist and author. In his late works, he turned away from the virtuosity and his music became more contemplative, almost philosophical.

Artists

The Court Music Orchestra of the National Gugak Center of Korea
The National Gugak Center of Korea has preserved a variety of culture and art resources including court music that has been passed down from generation to generation, folk music and dance, as well as new Korean music that will be the tradition of the future.
The Court Music Orchestra has been a part of the National Gugak Center of Korea throughout its entire history, performing and handing down royal court music in the spirit of Korean traditional culture. In general, the court music of Korea that is performed today mainly consists of pieces which were played in the royal court or in events organized by the royal household of the Joseon Dynasty (1392 – 1910). Some genres of court music were created during the Joseon Dynasty, whereas origins of other genres pre-date these. Court music served as a medium for people to live in a harmonious way as well as an important mode of communication in a variety of court rituals and banquets. In modern times, it is still enjoyed by Korean people who appreciate its beauty of movement and its stillness. Among this great tradition, Jongmyo Jeryeak (Royal Ancestral Shrine Music of Joseon Dynasty) was designated in 2001 as a part of the world cultural heritage list by UNESCO, substantiating its value and importance.

Sung-Won Yang

Cellist Sung-Won Yang has performed throughout the world as a soloist and chamber musician. He has given solo and chamber music concerts in prestigious venues as Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Center in New York, The Salle Pleyel and Théâtre des Champs Elysées in Paris, the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, the Terrace Theater at the Kennedy Center in Washington DC, the Musikverein in Vienna, the Opera City Hall in Tokyo, Symphony Hall in Osaka and the National Center for the Performing Arts in Beijing. His recitals have also led to other leading cities, such as London, Rome, Frankfurt, Madrid, Prague, Helsinki, Boston, Seattle, Tel Aviv, Shanghai, Sydney and among other cities.

Enrico Pace

Enrico Pace was born in Rimini, Italy. He studied piano with Franco Scala both at the Rossini Conservatory, Persaro, where he graduated in Conducting and Composition, and later at the Accademia Pianistica Incontricol Maestro, Imola. Jacques De Tièg was a valued mentor. Winning the Utrecht International Franz Liszt Piano Competition in 1989 marked the beginning of his international career.

When: Wednesday 2 August  2017, 7.30 pm
Where: Kings Place Hall One (90 York way, London, N1 9AG)

Kings Place

Online Price: £16.50 – £12.50 | Savers £9.50*

Programme
Hyeonak Yeongsanhoesang
- Sangnyeongsan
- Jungnyeongsan
- Seryeongsan
- Garakdeori
- Sanghyeondodeuri
- Hahyeondodeuri
- Yeombuldeuri
- Taryeong
- Gunak
Interval –
Liszt 
- 2 Elegies, S130 & S131
- Romance oubliée, S132
- La lugubre gondola, S134
- Die Zelle in Nonnenwerth, S382
- Pensees poetiques/ Consolations Nos 1-6, S172
- Ave Maria, S173 No. 2
- Cantique d’amour, S173
Chopin Polonaise brillante in C for cello and piano, Op. 3

 

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